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Ruth Edelman

Ruth Edelman (1929 – 2013)

Deputy Chairman of DJE Holdings and Mental Health Advocate, Age 84

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Please share your memories of Ruth in the comment section below.

Ruth Edelman, deputy chairman of DJE Holdings, parent company of her late husband’s eponymous global public relations firm, Edelman, and recognized mental health advocate, died peacefully at the University of Chicago Medical Center. Mrs. Edelman was 84 years old. She was married to Daniel J. Edelman for 59 years prior to his death this past January. Mrs. Edelman is survived by her three children Richard and Renee of New York City and John of Chicago; as well as three granddaughters Margot, Victoria and Amanda Edelman, all of New York City.

Throughout her life, Mrs. Edelman was a great supporter of numerous health organizations and nonprofits. She helped to significantly further the goals of the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association through her visibility as a patient advocate and philanthropist. In 1994, Mrs. Edelman became the first individual outside of the medical community to receive the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association’s Jan Fawcett Humanitarian Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to the understanding of depressive illness, commitment to research and sincere devotion to those suffering from depression.

She was also an advocate for the Save the Children Foundation, Chicago Project for Violence Prevention and Committee for Economic Growth of Israel. In addition, Mrs. Edelman was active in Chicago’s fine arts community, having raised funds for the Lyric Opera Company and the Chicago Art Institute. She worked for former U.S. Senator Charles Percy, helping him organize community events for more than a decade. She would later become the special events chair for the state of Illinois under Governor Jim Thompson.

However, Mrs. Edelman is best known as a driving force behind her late husband’s success. “Ruth was a part of Edelman from day one,” said Richard Edelman. “My parents created our business and established our culture. My mother had the poise and grace of a sought-after hostess, with the wit and wisdom of a savvy businesswoman. She charmed many a guest into becoming a client.”

Ruth Edelman was born Ruth Rozumoff in Racine, Wisconsin in 1929. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison as an economics major, she moved to Chicago where she met her future husband on a blind date. “I liked him,” said Mrs. Edelman, as quoted in Edelman and the Rise of Public Relations by Franz Wisner. “I liked him because he was smart, refined, a gentleman and hardworking. I wanted him (for my husband) from the first day.”

From her marriage to Dan in 1953 until his death earlier this year, Mrs. Edelman nurtured her family as tirelessly as she helped support his company. With Dan often on the road, she oversaw the children’s education with exacting standards of excellence. “It’s something that we looked forward to, that our children would live a better life if they got better grades. And they did,” she said.

In addition to her children and granddaughters, Mrs. Edelman is survived by her sister Rosalie Aronin, 86 years old and her daughters-in-law Roz Edelman and Susie Krohn.

Shiva will be held at the at Casino Club in Chicago and the memorial service will be held at the Temple Sinai in Chicago.  The funeral service will be private.

In lieu of flowers, please send donations to either Leukemia Research at the University of Chicago Medical Center: University of Chicago Gift and Record Services, Ruth Edelman Memorial, 1427 East 60th Street, Suite 120, Chicago, IL 60637 or online at https://www.kintera.org/site/c.phLWJ6PFKmG/b.6079897/k.8CE3/Make_A_Gift/apps/ka/sd/donorcustom.asp (specify “Ruth Edelman Leukemia Memorial”), or the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association: 730 N. Franklin Street, Suite 501Chicago, IL 60610-7204 or via phone 312-642-0049.

  • Amith Prabhu

    She was beautiful!. May her sould rest in peace.

  • Amy Hytowitz

    Richard, Renee and John – I’ll never forget my time with
    your parents at their home during Leadership Academy 2010. I know I’ve shared
    memories of that trip about your dad but I’m not sure if I’ve ever shared the
    memories of your mom. She sat next to your dad during the receiving line as we
    all waited to say hello. I was just as excited to meet her as I was to meet
    your dad; and I was so impressed by her presence. She was patient and kind as
    she listened to each of us so intently. She asked questions about our lives and
    our families. I always admired the way she looked at your dad and the respect
    she showed him throughout the evening. Attached is my favorite picture from
    that memory.

    My thoughts are with you and your family during this
    difficult time. Zichronah livracha.

    In deepest condolences,

    Amy

  • http://www.edelman.com/ Jon Silver

    Richard, Renee and John,

    I was so saddened to hear of Ruth’s passing. Not just because our firm has lost a matriarch; but because on a personal level, I could not help but think of the pain of losing both of your beloved parents within the space of one year.

    Years ago, I had the opportunity to take many phone calls from Ruth to share her thoughts and ideas for the Seroquel account, when I was leading the brand’s disease awareness and advocacy efforts for manic depressive illness out of NY Health. I was a VP at the time, and remember well the butterflies when I’d hear her voicemail and muster the courage to call RUTH EDELMAN back to talk about MY account.

    But each time we spoke, she was anything but intimidating. She was so kind to me. She offered her opinions with a strong but always respectful voice, asked me insightful questions, addressed me by name, and could not have been warmer. Her passion for mental health advocacy came through; and I always got off the phone feeling that I’d learned something important about the people Seroquel was designed to help. Ruth’s insight help me guide our clients to always do the right thing by the patient community.

    It has been years since my work on the Seroquel account; but I fondly remember these calls with her, and the lesson I learned to always keep the patient community steadfast in my mind as I counsel health clients and develop programs. To this day, as part of the Guild and a strategist within NY Health, this is a guiding principle of every program I write.

    May she rest in peace; and may you find peace in remembering the amazing woman she was.

    Thank you for letting me share my memory!

    Fondly,

    Aimee White-Charles, NY Health

  • Amy Hytowitz

    Richard, Renee and John – I’ll never forget my time with your parents at their home during Leadership Academy 2010. I know I’ve shared memories of that trip about your dad but I’m not sure if I’ve ever shared the memories of your mom. She sat next to your dad during the receiving line as we all waited to say hello. I was just as excited to meet her as I was to meet your dad; and I was so impressed by her presence. She was patient and kind as she listened to each of us so intently. She asked questions about our lives and our families. I always admired the way she looked at your dad and the respect she showed him throughout the evening. Attached is my favorite picture from that memory.

    My thoughts are with you and your family during this difficult time. Zichronah livracha.

    In deepest condolences,

    Amy

  • Aimee White-Charles

    Richard, Renee and John,

    I was so saddened to hear of Ruth’s passing. Not just because our firm has lost a matriarch; but because on a personal level, I could not help but think of the pain of losing both of your beloved parents within the space of one year.

    Years ago, I had the opportunity to take many phone calls from Ruth to share her thoughts and ideas for the Seroquel account, when I was leading the brand’s disease awareness and advocacy efforts for manic depressive illness out of NY Health. I was a VP at the time, and remember well the butterflies when I’d hear her voicemail and muster the courage to call RUTH EDELMAN back to talk about MY account.

    But each time we spoke, she was anything but intimidating. She was so kind to
    me. She offered her opinions with a strong but always respectful voice, asked me insightful questions, addressed me by name, and could not have been warmer. Her passion for mental health advocacy came through; and I always got off the phone feeling that I’d learned something important about the people Seroquel was designed to help. Ruth’s insight help me guide our clients to always do the right thing by the patient community.

    It has been years since my work on the Seroquel account; but I fondly remember these calls with her, and the lesson I learned to always keep the patient community steadfast in my mind as I counsel health clients and develop programs. To this day, as part of the Guild and a strategist within NY Health, this is a guiding principle of every program I write.

    May she rest in peace; and may you find peace in remembering the amazing woman she was.

    Thank you for letting me share my memory!

    Fondly,

    Aimee
    White-Charles, NY Health

  • Jeff Burnett

    Richard –

    I’m very sorry for your family’s loss. Please accept my condolences and wishes of comfort during this time of sorrow.

    A quick story…

    I had the pleasure of knowing Ruth when I was at Edelman in the 90s. I was working with Abbott on the manic depressive medication Depakote and Ruth was often speaking on behalf of the National Depressive and Manic Depressive Association at the time. With my background in mental health, I was asked to write a couple of speeches. We would meet for lunch at Bice across the street from office to discuss her thoughts and I would write a speech. Inevitably, I got edits back from Ruth and Dan. After I thanked her for every delicious and enjoyable lunch, she would always say to me, “eat there whenever you like, just tell them to put it on my bill.” Needless to say, I never did but Ruth’s gesture made me feel valued and I appreciated how gracious it was of her to offer.

    Jeff

  • Kathy Krenger

    Richard, Renee & John,
    I
    am truly sorry for your loss. What a difficult year it has been for your family but please know that your “other” Edelman family is here for you, always.
    There are so many wonderful stories being posted about Ruth — she has had such a positive impact on so many. One other that I’d like to share truly brings to life the connections Dan & Ruth had with their work….

    My first job at Edelman in the 1990s was as the lead of the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line account. As thrilled as I was to be leading such an iconic business, I had no idea the microscope it was under from the powers that be at Edelman. One busy day in November, as the Thanksgiving countdown was on, I received a brown inner-office envelop from Ruth Edelman. My heart jumped to my throat. Why, oh why, is Mrs. Edelman sending something to me? This cannot be good.
    I was wrong.

    Enclosed was my first Ruth-O-Gram (one of many). She was such an advocate for our work on Butterball and little did I know that the entire month of November, she watched for coverage like a hawk. That year, we managed to get Mike Leonard from the Today Show to visit Butterball University to become a Talk-Line operator for a day. The segment was long, truly brought the importance of the Talk-Line expertise to life and gave a behind-the-scenes look to the country that hadn’t been showcased before. Thank goodness, Ruth loved it! She was so proud of our work and shared her critique, in detail, with me, and, of course, copied Dan (who sent his own follow up note as well). She had to make sure that 1) Dan knew about the piece and 2) he knew that she was watching. They were joined at the hip then, as I believe they are now.

    I was sincerely honored to know that she was following us throughout the season year after year (and it sure made me work harder!). I was lucky to receive many notes of thanks and appreciation from Ruth during the Thanksgiving season over the years. For this, I am thankful for Ruth Edelman.

    Deepest sympathy to you and your family.
    Kathy

  • Jeff Sonnenfeld

    I am so sorry for you, Renee and John to have to come to terms with the recent back-to-back loss of both such vital pillars of your lives, the heart of your global enterprise such generous contributors to the soul of their city, and such inspiring loving forces in the lives of your friends as well.

    Yes, of course, we know the inevitability of this course of events rationally, but that does nothing to soften the reality of the emotional blow – and the emptiness – the chairs that will sit empty , the permanent sense of loss when you can’t reach out to hug, kiss, argue with, and confide in the people who knew you best on this planet. Yes, ten years ago, twenty years ago, would all have been more cruel – but no timing is right for such immediate physical loss.

    I do not wish to sound like I am minimizing this genuine loss or to sound too supernatural to say that something profoundly spiritual truly does live on – all is not lost.

    – First, you should have a tremendous sense of personal satisfaction that you WERE there for them when they needed you – as they always were there for you. You should have no sense of regret over difficult choice or remorse over how each minute was spent. You obtained the finest medical care scientifically and compassionately possible and provided the best loving support humanly possible.

    -Second, you made your parents so proud over the types of people you became – with grounded values, no sense of entitlement, integrity, accomplishment, and concern for others. They would NOT want you to feel any regret but to continue to feel their love and their pride.

    – Third, while we talked, at length, about your father Dan’s incredible professional legacy and personal model – but still more must be said about your mother Ruth. From the first time I met her – to decades later – I felt I was part of her family-as if she was a loving aunt. I know that may sound presumptuous – but she knew about me – my ups and downs, cared about me, celebrated me and offered candid constructive advice – even tough love – that comes only from someone who cares. I always looked forward to seeing her, hearing from her and hearing about her. Nothing she did was perfunctory or for show. She had so much love and wisdom that the more she gave, the more the reservoir refilled and overflowed. No one who met Ruth left without feeling strong affection and surely never forgot the encounter. She lit in torch in you and your family which burns brightly still – as she knows – but I hope she knew how well she lit that torch in others farther from her real family – to her hugely extended virtual family.

    With love, and sympathy for you – as well as affection and appreciation for your mother.

    Jeff

  • Steven Spurr

    Dear Richard, Renee and John,

    I am so sorry to hear this news.

    I had the privilege of meeting both of your parents in my time at Edelman, and am glad that they both impacted my Edelman experience.

    Your mother’s brave and open way she discussed her bipolar disorder was particularly inspiring. She was the first person I met who truly owned her condition and demanded not to be judged because of it – this was an important moment for me. My late father-in-law was an extreme sufferer and unfortunately endured much stigma because of his condition. Ruth’s upfront approach to mental health is something both my partner, Matt, and I take forward in our lives and I would like to thank her for that.

    My thoughts are with you and your family at this time.

    Steve

  • Holly Delinski

    Last March (and right before Ruth was diagnosed), I had a presentation in Chicago for Business Continuity. Renee graciously invited me to dinner with her and Ruth at their home the night I arrived. Before I left, I asked Renee to ask Ruth if there was anything I can bring. Renee said she would let me know. Renee called back the day I was to leave, and said that Ruth would love for me to bring 24 ounces of Nova Scotia salmon from Zabar’s. My mouth said yes, but my mind was then trying to figure out how to transport this on ice through security and get this safely to Chicago, still cold enough not to spoil. I raced down to Zabar’s and picked up the order, and I remember telling the cashier that by the end of the night, the lox would be in Chicago.

    I rushed home and found two frozen ice blocks in the back of the freezer that my boyfriend uses to keep his lunch cold on summer days on the soccer field. I wrapped the salmon, along with the ice blocks, in plastic, and then in paper and taped it tight and prepared it as carry-on. I arrived at the airport, where security soon found my precious cargo. I explained to him that someone I admire dearly in Chicago needed me to bring the salmon to her, so he carefully checked me out, along with the ice blocks and salmon, rolled his eyes, and let me through. I then found the nearest airport bar. I told the bartender that I would give him a big tip if he kept the salmon on ice for me until my plane took off, which he agreed to do only if I told him the predicament, which gave him a laugh. I boarded the plan and there I sat with the salmon under my seat in my purse, thankful for once that the plane was drafty and that the flight was short.

    After arriving into Midway, I checked my blackberry and Renee instructed me to go directly to 1301 North Astor before the hotel, so I jumped in a cab and put my purse in the trunk on a cold March evening, hoping for the ultimate Chicago chill to contribute to my mission. I can proudly say that I delivered a very grateful woman her delightful request, ice cold. Ruth then promptly served the lox as the appetizer over savory melba rounds, and my memorable, yet brief evening with Ruth and Renee began, while I easily relaxed among the comfortable and warm surroundings. It was one of my best Edelman experiences to date and one I will never, ever forget.

    Holly

  • John_Holland

    Dear Richard, Renee, John,

    I am deeply saddened to hear this news and extend my family’s condolences to you and your families. Both my boys still remember Ruth from her visits to Singapore when she and Dan would treat them like their own grandchildren. A special remembrance is being allowed to sleep in Dan and Ruth’s bed while Janette and I would have dinner with your Mum and Dad. Ruth was always a gracious hostess and a great contributor to the Edelman business.

    Regards

    John Holland

    • http://www.edelman.com/ Jon Silver

      Suggest we publish

  • Michele Loguidice

    Richard,

    I saw the news today and wanted to send my heartfelt condolences to you and your family on your mother’s passing.

    While I was working on the Toys R Us account, I had the good fortune to receive a call from your mother. She wanted to share with me what she was hearing on ‘the street’ from customers as it related to the company’s rumored restructuring and takeover rumors at the time. I truly appreciated the insight and definitely incorporated her thoughts into our integrated communications plan. The plan was better for it.

    As time passes, I hope that you and your family find comfort from wonderful memories that you shared with both of your parents and the knowledge of the profound influence that they had on those lucky enough to work for the company that all of you built together.

    My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family during this time.

    Best regards,

    Michele Loguidice

  • David Davis

    Hi Rich

    Through her tears Beryl has just been reminded of an anecdote she’d like to share with you….

    When your eldest daughter was born your parents were in London and she taxied around London with Ruth searching for a special type of push chair…not sure if she ever found it. She also wanted to buy a “baby Chanelle” handbag but Dan heard about the idea and said “You must be crazy…”or such words and it was quickly forgotten.

    As Dan was to me, Ruth was to Beryl….a role model whom she admired with genuine affection.

    David Davis
    Director
    Independent Ambulance Association

  • Wayne M. Cuculic

    Hello Richard. I would like to take this time to express my deepest sympathy to you, and the family. I have 20 + years of memories surrounding your mother; all good , and all very special to me. There was a 10 to 12 year period that we would speak at least 3 times a week, and a lot of the time in person. Your mother was the kind of person that would like to get business taken care of quickly, and out of the way to make room for something really worth talking and visiting about. I think that is what I will remember her for. The ultimate conversationalist. Your father’s passing was hard on me. For an unforeseen reason your mother’s is harder. I feel genuinely lucky to have known them both.

    Sincerely,

    Wayne M. Cuculic

  • Harold Koplewicz

    Dear Richard,
    Please accept my condolences on the death of your mother. As we have discussed I met Ruth nearly 15 years ago through Tipper Gore. I was impressed with her presence, her bravery and generosity. I hope the memories of the good times you shared with your mother gives you strength during this difficult time. Please extend my sympathy to your entire family.
    Harold

  • Barbara Davis

    Dear Richard, Renee and John,

    I am so sorry to hear about the passing of your darling, precious mother Ruth. I didn’t know she had been ill. I am so sorry.

    Ruth was a really good friend of Marvin and I, as was Dan. We shared the most wonderful times together. They were two wonderful, wonderful people and they take with them the love, respect and honor that all of you as a family gave to them.

    They were very special people. Marvin and I shared such wonderful moments with them.

    I am so sorry for your loss, but I do want to say you were blessed, having two such wonderful parents. Dan was magnificent. Ruth was beautiful, amazing and both were so much fun.

    My deepest sympathies to your family. I am thinking of you all at this time.

    Much love,

    Barbara Davis

  • Cory Edelman

    Dearest Richard, Renee and John,

    I was so terribly sorry to her about the passing of your Mom, Aunt Ruth, Ruth. I am also sorry to have missed the burial and the gathering at Richard’s home which is now in progress. I would have liked to have been there to honor her extraordinary life and to convey my condolences in person.

    You have lost your beloved mother — it is such a difficult time, especially as your parents went in fairly close proximity. Ruth was an extraordinary woman…strong, determined, feisty, difficult, warm, challenging, welcoming, clever, supportive, said it as it was (no mincing of words for her), tough, kind, intrigued and interested….she had a wide array of contrasting and conflicting characteristics and the whole package was alluring and compelling and appealing (and sometimes daunting). How wonderful to have had a mother like that! She played a myriad of roles…mother, wife, grandmother, co-partner to Dan in so many arenas, hostess, a person who just got things done, friend, companion and more.

    I remember fondly the years that Uncle Dan and Aunt Ruth traveled to Hong Kong and I was able to get to know them better as they held court at the Mandarin Grill. What a couple! Who could resist the dynamic duo…the hotel had never quite seen the like (and may not again). There were intimate gatherings with the three of us, there were long tables of clients and Edelman “partners” clinking glasses, there were meetings during which someone was getting a grilling, there was a little bit of everything. The twosome were always warm to me and still commented freely (and not always positively) on my career, my look, my boyfriend, whatever…I loved the intensity and the honesty and the focus and the tenderness (you really felt like the only person in the room). I also learned a lot more about them and I enjoyed every morsel. The maitre d’ doted on them, especially Ruth…he didn’t even mind if she tried one of the cakes on display (via her elegant fingertip) en route to dinner.

    I will save the remainder of my sentiments for a handwritten note but I wanted to say that I am thinking of you three and the rest of your family and sending my love and heartfelt condolences.

    She is unforgettable in every way.

    Love, Cory

  • Julianna Richter

    Richard, Renee, John-

    I am so sorry about the passing of your mother, Ruth Edelman.

    I met Ruth a few years ago at your family home in Chicago. It was my first dinner at Dan and Ruth’s and, as a new member of the Executive Committee, I was understandably nervous. Ruth was sitting down and was the picture of grace and elegance smiling in her Chanel suit. I sat down next to her to introduce myself and started to tell her about what I did at Edelman. She listened intently and asked me a few questions throughout, all the while watching me, surveying the others in the room and making sure that everything was in order. Her attention turned completely to her beloved Dan as soon as he entered the room. In that moment I could see she was tenacity and tenderness all in one.

    While I didn’t know Ruth the same way that many at Edelman did, I am grateful for the time I did spend with her, and in her presence. I will never forget what she said at Dan’s memorial last year about the life they had, and how much she adored him. I loved hearing stories about her yesterday and most of all that her proudest moment was “being Mrs. Daniel J. Edelman.” What Ruth and Dan had was a gift, and was indeed A Life Well Lived.

    May you all find peace and strength in eachother in the coming weeks. Please know that our thoughts are with you.

    With deepest sympathy,

    Julianna

  • Jim Markowich

    Meeting Ruth Edelman

    By 1987, I was 30, and a struggling, NYC artist. Using a skill set that I kept in reserve for emergencies — computer programming — I got a freelance gig with Edelman. It was to develop an application that quantified and qualified the agency’s new business efforts across its twenty two offices.

    Within months, I found myself at an Edelman managers’ meeting in Chicago, to present the recent results of this program. Valiantly maintaining an artist’s perverse sense of dignity, I was not appropriately tailored for the occasion.

    “Jimmy, are you ready?” Richard Edelman asked me that morning. Digitally, I was. He clarified: “Do you have a tie?” I remembered having a tie when my grandmother died in 1976, but, no, I hadn’t brought that with me. With avuncular concern, he loaned me one of his.

    As I recall now, my presentation of new business data for the previous half year was engaging, even contentious. A bar on the graph of new business letters sent by the Houston office went off the top of the screen, due to a mass mailing to every company in Texas. Singapore apparently did not make any new business calls, or send any letters, or have any meetings. The various general managers basked, or howled, according to their charts. Throughout it all, I felt natty.

    Many in attendance survived the two day Trial-by-Powerpoint. To celebrate, there was an evening reception at the Chicago home of Dan and Ruth Edelman, followed by an elegant dinner.

    With my neckwear, I was at least as presentable as my data, and I specifically recall the reception as my first meeting with Dan and Ruth. With Richard doing the introductory honors, I got to shake hands with Dan; to express my admiration both for his pioneering efforts in defining the field of public relations and for his namesake company, which so prominently competed in it.

    Richard was kind enough to detail for his mother the role I had recently begun playing for the agency, as she took my hand and looked me in the eye. After we exchanged some standard pleasantries, she inclined her head toward her husband and said slyly, “He must be successful. He’s wearing an Hermes tie.”

  • Drake McFeely

    Dear Roommie,

    I was sorry to see the news that Ruth has left us. I have so many fond recollections and honestly, Ruth getting us to chant ‘Honors! Honors!’ back in that Webster Hall dorm room probably drives me to this day. A good long life but she will be missed.

    My thoughts are with you and the family.

    Warmly,

    Drake

  • Derek Creevey

    When we celebrated the firm’s 50th anniversary, Ruth was asked what has changed. She looked into the camera and said: “we started at the time when people looked down on PR. They called us flacks to our face. Today, people respect PR.” I will never forget her expression. For me, Ruth meant–we’ve earned people’s begrudging respect, because of what we’ve done for some great companies.

    Ruth Edelman epitomized elegance, determination, loyalty and pride. Every time I saw Ruth, she stood tall beside Dan, listening intently to every conversation, and then providing private counsel.

    It wasn’t until I saw Michael Deaver sit next to and spend an entire executive meeting engaging Ruth did the penny drop for me. Dan always set, and expected, the very highest standard of excellence. Ruth was equally tough, but cared about people’s wellbeing. She treated Edelman employees as her guests. Ruth put herself at the disposal of others. She would call on Richard or whomever, to ensure employees were looked after. And whenever Ruth saw someone not acting in the best interests of the firm, she addressed it.

    One personal and embarrassing story — I had put on weight. Long commute, long hours sitting on my bum, and eating unhealthy food late at night will do it. It was—and is—sapping me of energy. Ruth called me out of blue, and said–I want you to see a friend of mine about your lifestyle. I tried really hard to placate Ruth and just get off the phone. But, of course, I couldn’t. I went to her Doctor friend that night, and was ushered-in past a weighting room full of very well dressed middle-aged patients. The Doctor spent several hours patiently coxing me to discuss my habits, and created personalized recommendations and plans. Ruth called and checked in regularly, and held me to account. My wife made fun of me. But, who takes the time to invest in an unimportant employee, don’t mind the person who helped build this firm?

    Ruth put people first. Dan put the work and quality first. Both were relentlessly hardworking and values-based. They loved life. They loved work. They loved each-other.

    Humble, proud, successful, loyal, protective and genuine.

    Thank you Ruth.

    Derek

    18 year Edelman employee.

  • Ron Schwartz

    I was there when Ruth received the Jan Fawcett Humanitarian award from NDMDA in 1994. Ruth contributed to what is now a thriving national organization named the Depressive and Bipolar Support Alliance.

  • Ashley Hegland

    Dear Richard –

    I wanted to send you a note to say that I was sorry to hear the news about your mother. My thought are with you and your family.

    I briefly met your mother in Chicago a few years ago and I must say that she made an impression on me – it must have been the way she carried herself, or her wonderful smile. I will not forget her.

    The announcement of her passing struck a chord with my wife and her family, as they have several family members who suffer from mental illness and they found it refreshing and important that your mother’s condition was mentioned puclicly. My wife’s father is a retired doctor and he is now spending time at the University of Calgary doing research on the brain and mental illness.

    Finally, on a separate note, I will be in NYC next week for the B+SP global meeting. If you are in town on Monday morning, or Thursday afternoon, it would be nice to briefly catch up with you, even for a five minute chat, as it has been a couple of years since we last saw each other. Please let me know if this might be possible.

    Take care,
    Ashley

  • Ame Wadler

    Richard:

    I have been struggling with what to say to you as no words are ever enough when losing someone as complex and powerfully present as your Mom.

    I remember how she – in equal parts – terrified me, made me laugh and silenced me with her bravery. I used to love when she’d stop in my office on 25 (the one with the blue couches) and lift up her shirt to show me how much weight she had lost – and then admonish me to do the same :)

    I remember being completely flummoxed in Paris when she told me and Mitch Markson to get table rounds for people to sit at during lunch – the one organized by the Paris office – because people shouldn’t stand and eat (Mitch and I blended into the crowd so she couldn’t find us again). We didn’t want to let her down but we didn’t want Paris mad at us either…

    And, I remember this most, being awestruck and teary over her bravery in publicly discussing her mental health challenges and her battle to find the right help. What a matter-of-fact role model she was.

    I also remember her as physically stunning and elegant, funny, charming, a little bit scary and extremely proud of all of you.

    My best wishes are with you, Renee and John and your entire family.

  • Geoff Gifkins

    Dear Richard, Renee, and John

    I am so sorry and saddened to hear of Ruths passing. My thoughts are with you all at this time.

    I will never forget the day I got the call from your mother asking me to work with her over the summer, at the time I was fully booked but as you know the rest is history, I was charmed and inspired by Ruth from Chicago to clear my schedule as “this was going to be the most fun I ever had.” She got my attention made me laugh and we became very good friends for many years.

    I celebrate her life and the way she lived it and thoroughly enjoyed the time I spent with your family. She was warm charming, loyal, very smart and had absolute presence.

    You were all always in her thoughts and conversations, she loved you and was so proud of you all and what you had achieved.

  • Laura Snow

    My condolences to Renee and Richard! I’m so sorry for your loss.

    Some of the best memories of my career were at Edelman NY. Renee and I used to pal-around NYC sometimes after work. Richard would routinely stop by my office and give me special assignments to get extra media placement for clients or take me to client crisis management meetings. Some of the most talented competent PR professionals I ever worked with were at Edelman NYC.

    I never met Ruth, but I know that Renee looked up to her mom. I’m sure this is a great loss, with a deep void. My heart-felt sympathy, Laura (Lippman) Snow

  • http://www.edelman.com/ Jon Silver

    Wanted to share to this audience Bill Zwecker’s Chicago Sun-Times article on Ruth’s memorial service. http://voices.suntimes.com/arts-entertainment/the-daily-sizzle/ruth-edelman-remembered-with-love/

  • Brian James

    My fondest memories of both Ruth & Dan were during a trip to Singapore & Indonesia while working for Asia Pulp & Paper’s ADR IPO in 1995 or ’96. Ruth & Dan were already in Asia and I asked for Dan to come to the final pitch to APP as their CEO would be at the meeting.

    Dan asked me to continue on with him to Hong Kong to participate in a Hitachi meeting.

    Ruth made sure I was comfortable and well taken care of on the flight; and she and I had dinner together at the Mandarin Oriental that evening.

    Ruth was a lovely lady; even trying to set up a date for me with one of her friend’s sons; if I liked red heads, she asked…

    The world is a better place for the work of both Ruth & Dan and I’m honored to have traveled with them once in my life. For that matter, Edelman was the best agency experience I had during my 12 years in NYC.

    Richard, I share your loss.

    Brian James
    San Francisco, CA

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